Compassion Cells

A Daily Practice for Creating Inner and World Peace

 

 

What if the inner peace and world peace are linked?

 

What if Thomas a Kempis’ 600-year-old words—"First keep peace with yourself, then you can bring peace to others”—provide a simple but crucial clue to how we can arrive at world peace?

 

"Compassion Cells: A Daily Practice for Inner and World Peace" is about how every person on our planet can help create a world at peace by learning to be deeply at peace within himself or herself. Through this presentation and a free e-book my intent is to encourage a proliferation of what I call “compassion cells” that have the power to move us past the scourge of terror cells and violence and injustice of all kinds.

 

Terror cells have great power to spread fear, despair, and feelings of helplessness. By choosing to become a compassion cell in humanity’s immune system, each person can embrace a new manner of thinking and living that advances the spiritual evolution of our species from perpetual violence and terror to lasting peace. If enough of us from all nations of the world become compassion cells, terror cells will find it more and more difficult to exist in our midst. We live with a sense that our lives are too small to make a difference, but immune cells in the human body do not behave that way. They simply show up, along with billions of other cells, to the task of healing.

 

We can each become a compassion cell by practicing daily what I call oneness consciousness—a cultivation of the perceptions that there is only one human family on Earth and that all human beings are equally worthy of love and compassion. Oneness consciousness brings inner peace because it allows us to flow with a source of peace, love, and compassion much larger than ourselves. It frees us to give up the us-versus-them thinking that creates unnecessary internal discord. When we transform our inner world in this way, we contribute to the transformation of the whole world.

website © 2014 by The Winged Life

All writing excerpts on this site copyrighted by Kevin Anderson.  For permissions, email wingedlifeinfo@gmail.com

Crecopia moth photo in header used by permission of Scott Rosenfeld, scottrosenfeldphoto.com